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. and then when re-elected as president again of planet earth's biggest nation, russia. vladimir putin biggest winner of 2012. >> "biggest loser," pat? >> general david petraeus. cia most famous general of his generation caught in a honey trap and kwon. >> the nra national rifle association which has no answer to why americans should be allowed to buy and possess assault weapons with rounds they can shoot off and kill little children. >> mark. >> the 23 million americans who remain out of work and have been out of work for a long period of time. >> seldom aidle son who backed candidates with millions of dollars, including mitt romney, and though lost. >> how many millions? >> all total? >> five or something? i think it's in the neighborhood of the 70s. >> yeah. >> right. he is moving along. the biggest loser of 2012 lance armstrong for using performance-enhancing drugs. armstrong was stripped of his tour de france titles and sponsor contracts worth 15 to $18 million. biggest loser. >>> okay. best politician. >> wisconsin governor scott walker. he put through his right to work laws. he didn't w
agricultural areas in the country. but kenya just months away from an election. experts say this is about power and money. >> it is really about politics and the forthcoming election. and it's about numbers. you have a grouping in which the community and the fight or the struggle or the contest for and political dominance as far as the next elections are concerned. >> what happened on friday is all too similar in villages in august and september. more than 100 people were killed and thousands were forced to leave their homes. it was the worst fighting since the election five years ago. poll -- the electoral commission have identified 27 hot spots around the country where they say there could be potential violence during the election. >> the conflict between these two warring communities could grow. >> to egypt now where there have been violent clashes between rival protestors in alexandria. the demonstrators square off on the constitution. the final vote on the draft is scheduled this saturday. >> buses and several cars were set on fire. they were -- belonged to the muslim brotherhood. the rall
to gain nothing. >> she mentioned the election. that is the big focus. >> indeed. if the referendum does result in a yes vote the next stage is another election within 60 days. the president will have to call new parliamentary elections. once again the focus in that campaign will still be a debate about the constitution. the constitution that would appear that nearly as many as half of those and have voted had rejected it. the decree by which this draft constitution is passed will have an immense impact on the political debate that we are likely to see in coming weeks. >> thank you very much. syrian activists say the army is shelving several districts in the capital. the syrian observatory group and dozens more were wounded in the attack. heavy fighting has also been reported next to the palestinian refugee camp. it was on siege four days earlier this week. they are willing to impose a no- fly zone in elbow -- aleppo. they will sit down commercial planes. they say they will not be responsible for the deaths of any passengers. a suicide bomber has attacked a political rally in northwest p
of that and i want to acknowledge matt haney for coming into this family of elected school board members and hopefully you will get the spirit of all of this. and i would say one last -- not last thing, but one more thing. the last six months, i have to say that it's been a political process. there was a lot of tensions and i'm real thankful that my three colleagues who were running for re-election are re-elected. they won re-election pretty readily despite opposition. i just want to say one thing about this, let's move on and really all focus. focus on our students and just move on. i hope to continue my interest in supporting our public schools despite all the range of new issues, i must respond to at city hall. just one sad thing and i wish i had a little more time to accomplish -- it's going to be on tonight's agenda as first reading. it's an opportunity for us to make a statement that we do care about people who live in the city. we do care about people who stay in the city and we do care about people, in particular, people of minority businesses and businesses run by women in th
that just got walloped in the election. can you expound on your theory there? >> first, let me just talk about democrats. you're too young to remember this, ari, but there was a period of time when people were wondering -- >> i dyed my hair, john. >> people were wondering when democrats could ever win a presidential election again, that's because they were on the wrong side of main street america, on some cultural change happening in the country. they were on the wrong side of issues like the death penalty, on issues like the use of force in foreign affairs, and it wasn't until they'd gotten whacked, george mcgovern lost overwhelmingly, mike ducacas was beaten pretty soundly. after all those things happened, the democratic party through bill clinton and others like him trying to change it, made the party more acceptable to the american people. republicans have not gotten there yet. it was a party as we saw in the election, a declining -- white share of the vote is the declining share of the electorate. their share is going up, but not enough to compensate. >> right. >> right now the sort
the election. that's coming up on tomorrow's edition of the "washington journal." i want to thank everybody for participating in today's program. we'll see you again tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> net and discussion on the referendum vote in which continues this weekend. the house hearing on violence in the eastern congo tiff after that remark by leon panetta. the muslim brotherhood current a victory and the first round of voting on the constitution must weaken. monday experts reviewed the latest and spoke about what they may mean for the future of the country. the brookings institution and the state department official>> thank you so much for coming on a rainy monday morning. can everyone hear me? is this microphone working? in the back? good. okay. well, welcome to the saban center for middle east policy at the brookings institution. we're here on the monday morning after egyptians began, although they haven't finished, voting on whether or not to approve the dr
represented for our community in terms of a step forward. we are now elected lgbt peep to office and harvey was such an incredible trail blazer, not? in just getting elected, but in being a great leader and always holding his head high for our community. and i know when i was first sworn into office, one of the things that i always kept in mind was something that i understand harvey to have said, * that when you go into city hall, you walk up the central staircase. you don't walk on one of the side staircases because for our community, it is so important for us to walk up that central staircase and for us to be in the middle of everything and for everyone to know that we are here. and all these years later, we've made a lot of strides in the lgbt community, but we still have so much work to do around hiv issues, around our youth, around discrimination, around transinclusion, and all the things that we know that harvey had he been here today would still be working on and leading on. and, so, we have to keep doing our work. and frankly, we can't take for granted that queer people are going t
apart. many republicans feel they were elected under a pledge not to raise taxes no matter what. democrats were elected under a pledge that everyone over a quarter million dollars has to have their taxes locked in. once we come back, actually right now talks are going on right now i'm sure between the staffs of the speaker and the white house. it is not as if nothing has been done. if people want a deal they can have it. if not, it can be difficult. i say it is 50/50. >> one thing you have been following are the hearings on libya. hillary clinton, secretary of state has a virus, a con cuss, and wasn't -- a concussion and wasn't able to testify. at this point, what do you think we will learn from the secretary that we are not learning from these hearings? is libya something that will stay with her should she decide to have a run next go around? >> of all of the members on the cabinet, i think secretary clinton is probably the most able and has done the best job. obviously she has questions to answer in benghazi. the report was accurate. i don't believe it did reach her. she has a
or six weeks after election he has still not, laura, put a inning single major item on the table. that is the problem. >> laura: you can respond to stephen. true that john boehner didn't help with the plan bfiasco. stephen is right, isn't he not about harry reid, the idea that he is leading is farcicle. >> they did pass legislation to ensure that taxes wouldn't go up on anybody making $250,000. the senate actually passed legislation. >> laura: there were no spending cuts in that, though. >> the budget control act had $1.5 trillion in spending cuts already approved. so say that the senate hasn't approved spending cuts in the last congress is not true. the problem is this and i feel bad for john boehner if you were obama you don't know who to negotiate with. even with john boehner were to come to obama with a deal, john boehner is being held host and by members of his own caucus who won't let him do that. boehner can work with democrats to get it passnd and throw some of his support with the democrats to get it passed but the problem for john boehner is he has an election coming up
in washington, what happened to the immigration debate we all expected after election day? and leading into this holiday weekend, thousands of flights being delayed, look at the list here as a winter storm hits the midwest, we will tell you what is ahead for the travel plans. we begin with the stalled fiscal cliff debate. president obama and his family are vacationing in hawaii and congress is on holiday recess. both sides are holding out hope that they will be able to reach a deal. >> this is something within our capacity to solve. it does not take this much work. we just have to do the right thing. >> of course, hope springs eternal and i know we have it in us to come together and do the right thing. >> listen to that, and it seems like they are both positive and feel something can get done. while both sides are away, the away and president in hawaii, can they get something done? >> reporter: well, look, richard, this will be a working vacation for president obama and i can also tell you that staffers on both sides of pennsylvania avenue will be in talks over the next several days de
and he never went back until the last week of the election. it's really puzzling. romney had a shot there. go there after you pick someone from that state and you never go back? host: why was john kerry's enormous wealth and not an issue in 2004? guest: it was, but that campaign was so much defined by 9/11, john kerry, and the swift voting issue. the problem is not enormously wealthy candidates, but can they make a pitch to the working-class voters. it does not matter what is in your bank account of what is out there in public. guest: part of the reason john kerry of losses because he and his wife were characterized the same way they did to rodney as the out of touch, french looking couple who cannot relate the middle class americans. guest: in the even does become a little bit of french. guest: it was an issue in 2004 and it was very harmful in terms of his character. host: you write about this in the book, this ad that came out just before the election and it played heavily in ohio. let's watch. "washington journal--- >> fact checkers say his attack on romney is false. he is a plan to h
at some of the most memorable presidential moments of this election year. >>> president obama and senate members will be here in washington tomorrow, but we'll be hearing crickets on the house floor. nbc news has learned the republican leadership has not given representatives the 48-hour notice to return to work, another sign of inaction on the fiscal cliff front. joining me now for our daily fix, mr. jonathan capehart, msnbc contributor and "washington post" editorial writer. jonathan, we're just six days away, no indication from house republicans that they are going to come back any time soon. the leadership has gone mum on that. we know there's not been communication between boehner and mcconnell, obama and boehner. are you amazed with this short amount of time to go there seems to be no sense of urgency on either side? >> am i amazed, given what we went through with the debt ceiling, no, i'm not amazed. i think there are forces here in this town that would like for us, sure people would like for there to be a deal, but going over the cliff on january 1st when there's this notion wher
united system with a federal election commission that's completely out of control and with other agencies unable to do anything about it. a lot of money coming in in ways that intimidate political actors until the policy process in a very bad way and the way that will only enhance the quality. one example from north carolina riva group ventures who want to influence the state legislature on a bill prepared a bunch of model commercials that destroyed members of the legislature. when a gc comment had nothing to do a type of culture. it basically defined in this child molesting aliens out to destroy the fabric of america and show them the commercials and said if we don't get what we want millions of dollars could be spent on commercials just like this. they got what they wanted to give him money. the idea this is not correct team from anthony kennedy was on a different planet in a different universe than the real world of what we face. so there's all of that to do with the marketing model legislation written basically by a signature is biggest plugged right in. it's the gilded age brought up
of these issues, it's going to be used against me in the 2014 election and i'm not going there. >> paul: that's what they just didn't want to take that step, they figured then they'll suffer. it will ab very bad vote and so, i mean, john boehner is in a very tough spot, as jason said because ultimately, if you can't deliver the the votes on the floor, you either have to turn it over to the democrats and pass something with a handful of republicans and democrats, which may be what happened, or you end up going over the cliff. >> you know, i think the main problem for boehner is actually not what he does, but how -- who it gets blamed on, that's what he has to work harder on communicating to the american people. there are three branches of government, you know, we didn't elect president obama to be th dictator. we have another branch which, where the democrats lost and people who voted for republicans were very concerned about the size of government, paul. i mean, they've allowed this to be a debate about tax rates, but the real problem, i think, for most republicans and people who voted for th
to the president elect, mr. john finley. frost and restated the name of a scholar from harvard. the only new frost. friendly may have been a friend to frost, but finley was no jack kennedy. [laughter] here is a depiction of george washington inauguration, the first one, 1789 which took place in new york city which was our capital of the time. the next two and i eurasia's to press in philadelphia. the first one in washington was in 1801. there is a myth, legend that george washington added the words so help me god at the end of the health. there is no real proof that he said that. nobody ever wrote that he stepped out of those four words of the time, but it has come to be a tradition, at least from 1933 until present, those words have been added at the end of the health. this is 1929, and on the left is chief justice william howard taft. he is investing yield of office to the new president, herbert hoover. taft is the only person ever to be both president and chief justice. and he actually made a little mistake in the of that year. you're supposed to say preserve, protect and defend the constitutio
was thinking slower-elect, you know what i'm saying? >> remember this humble moment. [laughter] say that one more time. >> what does it mean to you personally [inaudible] -- >> i think what it means to me personally is that 18 years ago the city of charleston county county-wide gave me an opportunity to represent him based on values and issues. a couple of years later the folks from the house gave me an opportunity to represent their issues and their values. two years ago the first district gave me an opportunity to represent their issues and values. what i've not ever heard on the campaign trail was besides the fact that you're black or because you're black, here's what we want to do. they've asked me questions about values and issues, and that's an amazing thing. i think it speaks to the evolution of south carolina and of our nation. it speaks to the heart of the good people in our nation and specifically of our state. i would say this -- more importantly than the complexion that i have, i think back to growing up in a single-parent household. i'd love to speak to the single moms out there
. >> after a few words of advice at home the bay area's newly elected congressman is about to get a crash course in washington politics. how the young lawmaker thinks he can help what many consider a broken system. ======b r e a k >> on tap for the next 24 hours more rain and i guess some big waves, too right, liz? >> we have a high surf advisory in effect for tomorrow. in the meantime we've got cold temperatures, overcast skies, a live look over the pleasanton area. we have wet weather heading our way. we'll show you coming up. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, the fiscal cliff. the dow is _ _ this marks the longt losing >>> stocks once again heading lower for a fifth day on those concerns about the fiscal cliff. the dow is down 106 plus points marking the longest losing streak in three months. >>> former bay area city councilman is about to learn firsthand how washington works or doesn't work. he is newly elected congressman heading on to the capitol hill quagmire. cbs5 reporter juliette goodrich talked to elect eric st -- eric swelwell. >> it is avoidable. >> reporter: he said he's ready to bring som
, mario monti has ruled out running in the february elections. he said he would consider leaving a future government is asked to. the as political parties not to destroy his achievement in saving the country from crisis. >> on sunday mario monti announced his plans for the future. two days after his resignation. >> i am not joining any specific party. i like the parties and the social class is to take home these ideas. or any other ideas. we need to come up with ideas. i hope the ideas here will be adopted by the vast majority of parliaments and also that it will bring new energy to the debate. >> it will not run directly into the next elections. he said to be ready to leave the country again. on one condition. at the next ruling party followed the strike plan of reforms said to bring its early back on the path of economic growth. he was forced to resign on friday, months before the end of his term after berlusconi's party withdrew their support. berlusconi says monti could not follow. after the press conference mario monti returned here in the officials prime minister residence. where he
more establishment name. my own newsletters forecast and strategies. seven robbery and was elected and it has been a great ride. i consider myself a survivor in many ways. i maintained my contacts and the cia because i think there are a good source for information. we're a global economy, and the cia does everything. they've done research on virtually everything. >> we invited you want book tv to talk about the making of modern economics, the lives and ideas of right thinkers. >> cannot in 2001. it took me about five years to sit down and actually right. probably a lifetime of learning. and then the second edition came out in 2009 right after the financial crisis. we felt it needed to be updated after that event because my final chapter is dr. smith goes to washington, the triumph of free-market economics. of course there was a little premature considering what happened since 2008. we had to revise that. >> how is this book organized? >> well, initially when i tried to do was create an alternative to robert popular book of world philosophers. i wish i had that title. it's the story
was killed after an election rally. >> more than 200,000 turned out looking to the past, present and future. three generations of pakistan's political dynasty. >> they remembered former president bhutto gunned down five years ago on thursday. her life mirrored her father's father's, dying a violent death. the crowd heard from her husband, pakistan's current president. and they were introduced to the next generation her 24-year-old son who becomes the chairman of the pakistan people's party. [speaking foreign language] >> today, it is sad and a delightful day for me. i feel proud as the son of benazir bhutto's son, i want to tell you by the grace of god he has completed his studies but now this is his training time. >> this was his first major political speech. he memorized it because having memorized in dubai he's not fluent. >> my honorable mother was killed publically. thousands of workers have been murdered but we did not abandoned pakistan and would not abandon pakistan. don't leave benazir bhutto in the hands of tyrants. two issues hung over this event one, who killed benazir bhutto? h
that happened after the election and i said, sean i did it and he said yes you did and then he walked me from his office into the champ better -- sorry and he turned on the lights, and it was empty and i remember this profound sense washed over me and it was a sense to serve san francisco but it was a sense that to share with sean somebody i looked up to -- sorry you know how difficult this is going to be for me and i was going to try to kef my exposure because one of the thing that i admire most about sean is that he has a demand and respect for board rules. he stands up every single time he speaks. and that is something that he doesn't even tell anyone to do and no one telling us you to do it, its something that is modeled and he has demonstrated it even when he was upset and tossing the mike around he still stood up when he had a rebuttal he stood up when he disagreed he stood up and when he agreed he stood up and i think that is really quintessential because sean stands up. when he was the only one on that ten-one vote he still stands up. he respected this chamber and respects this pul
elections will now be held in the same cycle as the presidential elections. for veterans, the department of veterans affairs will be required to give out something of their status. another new law will make it easier to protect kids and disabled -- a parent or guardian can freeze their credit report. advocates say they hope will protect foster children. >> we are hoping that the credit bureaus and the department of human resources will be able to get to some data sharing so they can freeze them or stall them as well as help them to get access to their credit report. >> maryland is the first state to pass bill law allowing minors the ability to freeze their credit reports. kim dacey, wbal-tv 11 news. >> 37 degrees at 5:06. a petition growing against a church group. >> george h.w. bush takes a turn for the worse. >> this is a live picture on the west side. it looks pretty good here. >> welcome back to 11 news today. 5:09. 41 degrees downtown. a few clouds in the sky. the precipitation has ended downtown. temperatures are above the freezing mark. that keeps the roads from freezing. some are
in june that upheld obama care? or was it the big impact our country's minorities had this year to re-elect the president? was it the big fat super pac money that swamped presidential politics this year or the tea party's influence over the republicans rose up over two years ago but continued to dominate the g.o.p. this year. >> i think it's money but not big money, little money. obama raised $1 billion this year, half of it in donations from small people, small amounts, and half in the last three months so astonishing swell of cash at a time when people thought he would be outspent. chris: over and over again, an email asking for $5. >> i'm going with the tea party because it had such an impact on the republican primary process and what the republican party needs to fix now because if they go through that again in 2016, they're in trouble again. >> i'm going john roberts and the supreme court. i think that was a game changer. i can't imagine what conversation we'd be having if they struck down obama care or not ruled in favor. chris: the republicans could have really used that. >> they cou
problem of the country, the spending. >> and it's sort of interesting. nevada re-election him, that's their choice but the rest of the country is held hostage. people in my home state of wisconsin, if they don't like harry reid has majority leader there's nothing they can do. they can put pressure on their senators, but for the most part senator harry reid is in a very powerful position. >> i think he's taking orders from president obama. this is time for the president of the united states to lead. there's only one person who has the pen who can sign into law the law preventing us from going over the cliff and if the president actually wanted to get it done, he would tell harry reid and others this is what we had to do and he would make the arrangement to make sure we didn't go over the cliff. so i think he's just -- senator reid is just playing the role for president obama. >> you said he's eager to go over the cliff because he gets his revenue, he gets his cut. >> blame republicans. >> and he can blame republicans but the problem is many economists say if we do go over the cliff,
state hood he was elected the state's first full member of the house of representatives. three years later in 1962 he was elected to the u.s. senate where he would serve for five decades, the second longest tenure in this chambers history. i am honored to have served with him throughout my entire senate service. while he and i often found oufferses on different sides on issues, i always knew him to be a man of principle and deenssi. one of the few times we found ourselves on the same side came when the late senator ted stevens asked us for help when his character was called into question. now politically speaking participating in senator stevens trial held no benefit for senator inouye. it would have been easy for senator inouye to deny his friends question and few would have blamed him for it. but that's not how he operated. rather than letting a friend fend for himself he showed great loyalty in his willing tons testify to his friend's good character, to put his own reputation on the line in service of a friend. and i had a similar privilege. once against, mr. president. both senat
was the longest u.s. serving member. he was elected to the house of representatives in 1952 and the u.s. senate in 1958. two former staffers, ira schapiro and david corbin, talked about the senator's life. next on c-span, nikki haley. >> the first speaker is irish schapiro. -- ira shapiro. he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, it he served as a leading u.s. trader and .arned the rank of staff thaman he was described as antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. se
and picked colleen or another member of congress, that would trigger a special election and you would have to replace another person. this is an easy fix to get somebody to start voting right away without triggering any special election for the house. >> they want that vote on the fiscal cliff. still the employee of the month and thank you so much. next, breaking with boehner. a month ago, oklahoma congressman tom cole endorsed compromising and going-over the fiscal cliff. what's he saying now? the minority report, we will get the view from the other side of the aisle with john yarmouth. a look ahead at the president's schedule. you are watching t"the daily rundown" on msnbc. i love the holidays. and with my bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i love 'em even more. i earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. 2% on groceries. 3% on gas. automatically. no hoops to jump through. that's 1% back on... [ toy robot sounds ] 2% on pumpkin pie. and apple. 3% back on 4 trips to the airport. it's as easy as... -[ man ] 1... -[ woman ] 2... [ woman ] 3. [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash re
have a base. and the purists are in control of the primary elections and you wind up with a house that doesn't agree with compromise. any time boehner gets too close to some kind of compromise that they don't like, they are standing there with knives ready to kind of oust him and put somebody else in there. >> she's absolutely right. that idea of ideological purism. you're starting to see this. you're starting to reference the give up debate. they don't want any change, even with 20 babies dead in newtown. they want no new laws. we really have almost no laws restricting guns at all. but they want no new laws, no new change. so they move from the party wealthy, now to the party of glocks. they say don't want people to have the right to bear arms, but they want to have people have the right to bear killing machines that can kill people with 20, 30, 40 round clips. this is not big ten politics. almost all of these policies are insulting some large group of people. >> which is why they lost the election. >> they have a very small coalition. >> they don't even have the reign. but when
with that. and if this guy, who was actually elected to represent 12 million members of the afl-cio today, no one will go live to him either. and so what did this man have to say today? this man who got all of this attention. this man who is the ceo of a $200 million business that plays with the dues money of 4 million people, most of whom disagree with this man on some of the issues he cares about most. >> now, we must speak. for the safety of our nation's children. no one, nobody has addressed the most important pressing and immediate question we face. how do we protect our children right now? starting today. in a way that we know works. >> and then he suggested something that you cannot do right now starting today. put a police officer in every school in america. that would require hiring at least 132,133 new police officers. now just based on the median salary for police officers in america, that would cost $6.7 billion a year. there is not a town or city or state in america that has extra money lying around today to hire extra police officers. if $6.7 billion had to be raised from ne
confidently as it indicated they won the election campaigning on this very issue and that's all that they had at stake was trying to bring to the american people what they claim was the real agenda in the course of the campaign, extend the bush era tax cuts for making more than $250,000 and whatever the republicans want to say about them, they're fine to say and right now the republicans continue with a lot of sniping directed at this white house. earlier today, senators corker and alexander making statements basically blaming them for the stalemate, taking place right now. but i think it's pretty clear that the white house feels confidently that even if they don't have control of the house, they have enough republicans in the house that if a vote were allowed there, that with the democrats all supporting the president and enough republicans they could move this thing. >> krystal? >> reporter: can i take a whack at that question, please? it's mike viqueira. the question is, did the president know and as charles krauthammer outlined, you know, that he was going to crush the republican oppositi
his second term. he was elected to lead. we can still avoid going over the fiscal cliff if we step for this week and republicans to solve this problem and solve it now. >> we talk with washington post reporter laurie montgomery this morning for the update on the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> tell us, what kind of a deal the president offered and what is new in the negotiations among the senators and between the senators and the white house? >> there does not appear to be anything new. the policy they are talking about are the same public -- policies that have been on the table for weeks. what is new is they seem to have finally agreed they will move forward with something. there is no guarantee that the republican leader and democratic leader will be able to put together an agreement. but they are now saying they will try to do it. they are working together and amy towards a vote sunday are monday. >> what is the scuttlebutt among the rank-and-file senators about whether or not they're going to be able to pull this off before the end of the weekend? >> it happened so late, and it w
you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the republican strategy for securing a romney victory would come to grief so kind of spectacularly. i mean, i'm telling you. even the communities who came out to vote, i think, were shocked by their own numbers and by their own power. i mean, when you look at the cuban community in florida, a community that has historically voted super conservative and suddenly see an entirely new generation voting, and you see those numbers that they put up for obama. it was extraordinary. and i think that a lot of folks have very poor sense of what's happening in this country on the ground. i mean, they're kind of all the way up he
to you our senate- elect tim scott. >> thank you. \[applause] >> thank you. thank y'all very much. before we get started, i was thinking that this is a great day of celebration in many, many ways. but our nation still mourns. and i wanted to take a moment of silence for newtown, connecticut. if you'd join me, please. \[moment of silence] >> thank you. i will tell you that this is an exciting day for many, many reasons, but for me, the first thing i wanted to say is just thank you to my lord and savior, jesus christ, to be honest with you. \[applause] i believe that when you start out in a single-parent household with a mom who works 16 hours a day and you're looking at a future that doesn't look as bright and you're living in north charleston, south carolina, you build a strength that comes from ching the appreciation and understanding that is not about you, it's about your faith, it's about your family. and i love my mother, who's here with me, frances scott, and i'm very thankful to the good lord and to a strong mom who believes that sometimes love has to come at the end of a switch, an
their races. on capitol hill the election brought the total number of women in the senate to 20, 16 democrats and four republicans, and 78 women in the house, 58 democrats, 20 republicans. as budget negotiations continued to loom, women were asked whether having equal female representation in congress would have chaed things. >> we would have dealt with that. it's critical to the country. we need to provide certainty for businesses for our families. so they will know what they're looking at over the next year and again as women i think we tend to be consensus builders, we like to get lots of inbuilt then work together to get things done. >> marriage equality laws passed during the election took effect in washington state and maryland as same sex couples lined up to formalize their unions. now the issue goes to the supreme court. earlier in the year the court affirmed the legality of obamacare, also known as the patient protection and affordable care act. with that 5-4 decision and the re-election of president obama states are now working towards putting the law into effect. and even before pr
circumstances. >> this is outside of the book but i will do it anyway because i've been doing general election for the times. talking to jim messina the campaign manager of the obama campaign and david axelrod and rahm emanuel and stephanie cutter and asking them you know, how would the next years under obama, given that the house composition -- >> is almost certainly going to be similar. >> how will things be different and uniformly their answer, in other words the talking point, was that the fever will break, that the american people if they vote for president obama for another four years will basically be voting against obstructionist and the republicans will get the message and they will walk in a sultry fashion toward the center of. >> i can see that happening at all. >> no, no and if that is her talking point and they are siding with the. >> are you optimistic to say that governor romney would have one that there is and you waiting for him after he gets into office? >> no, no i'm not and i wrote a story for "the new york times magazine" on governor romney and specifically on his kind of
in this election. it was a non fctor. why in the world would there be so much concerin the republican party about the tea party. why was there an idea that you're better off today than you were four years ago and pick 2008 as the year, he baseline, and it was a lousy year. in point of fact, just about everybody is. what o you make? very quickly. >> your immediate questn, yes, we were better off than the depths of being in a whole. president clinton explained the argument that we were climbing t. by that time election day, th percentage of people is of the country going in their right correction,saw the economy improving, higher than has been, ronald reagan when he was reelected. lou: i don't have the time. >> he was there. lou: this is the -- why did he call -- mixing his old boss. why did he not call first governor chris christie who gave him the photo op, four and half hours and a big hug there was persuasive to just about 15 percent of the voters. should that not have been his first document. >> probably did not want to run again. facing a lot of questions like those. lou: there are no questio
baltimore city elections will now be held in the same cycle as the presidential elections. that means current officials will get an extra year in office. for veterans, the department of veterans affairs will be required to give out their status. another new law will make it easier to protect kids and disabled adults from identity theft.. a parent or guardian can freeze their credit report. advocates say they hope it will protect foster children. they are especially vulnerable. >> we are hoping that the credit bureaus and the department of human resources will be able to get to some data sharing so they can freeze them or stall them as well as help them to get access to their credit report. >> maryland is the first state to pass a law allowing minors the ability to freeze their credit reports. kim dacey, wbal-tv 11 news. >> you can call the double deadline. hoping to get a deal in the next few days to avoid going of the fiscal cliff. hallie jackson has more. >> the treasury is making moves. otherwise we have the debt limit on monday. that is the last day of fiscal cliff talks. the pres
elected, he would have strained things much better than they are now. that is part of the problem. host: what -- caller: character, honesty. host: mitt romney is your choice. caller: that is about it. host: patrick is next. caller: my political hero is president obama. host: why so? caller: he has gone through a lot. he has kept his cool during the course of the year. i look forward to him doing better. host: one thing that stands out as far as his accomplishments. caller: bringing the end to osama bin laden. i think he has done very well. he has been patient and the adult for working with the republicans that tried to make everything for the country. host: president obama amongst others being listed this morning from the phones and facebook and twitter. after thestory passing of senator daniel in a the washington times." host: the code of hawaii -- the governor of hawaii possibly been the replacement for daniel inouye, reported by cbs news. picking up on the remaining time and before the next senate, comes in. president obama spoke on friday and talked about the senator's service and h
consideration to drafting shriver as his running mate in the 1964 election. but the kennedy family so most historians tell us wanted to robert kennedy to assume political leadership, and eventually hubert humphrey to the vice presidency. shortly after the election, johnson asked shriver to head the war on poverty. some of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the of america. the best-selling study of poverty by the holy cross alumni michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appellation and in america's inner cities. shriver is accepted the challenge and got to work first of all research and the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. she found 30 million americans then living in poverty, and his agenda for them was and handouts employment through programs like the preschool head program, a dhaka court to retrain adults for in the dhaka the postindustrial economy and vista volunteers in service to america often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs come stress and community leadership, global planning with federal funds, and there were
finance minister. >> reporter: the parliament of japan has elected shinzo abe as the country's seventh prime minister in six years. abe was sworn in today after being chosen by his conservative-leaning liberal democratic party. the party won power in this month's elections, for the first time since 2009. abe has called for bold measures to bolster japan's ailing economy. he previously served as prime minister from 2006 to 2007. russian lawmakers gave final approval today to a ban on americans adopting russian children. it's part of a series of reactions to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russian human rights abusers. in washington today, a state department spokesman called the ban misguided. and adoption groups in moscow said it would harm children most. >> ( translated ): today we don't have that number of russian families who are willing to adopt, and the children who go to adopted families abroad are the children that russian families wouldn't take. there must be at least five refusals by russian families for the child to go to foreign parents. for that reason i don't see within this
play here. i don't see him behaving as a rational leader on this. >> there's no election for 22 months and as everyone knows, polls now about predictable capacity in november of 2014 are useless and the republicans know they can be incredibly unpopular and in defacto terms, changes nothing in washington other than unpopular. unpopular in october of 2014, they have a problem. if they're unpopular in january of 2013, you have gridlock in washington. >> who makes the next move? >> senator mcconnell's probably in the best position. he's in very close touch with the president, the white house and democrats in both the senate and the house have been in very close coordination throughout this. they have been in lockstep. it was interesting to note that when we saw the plan "b" chaos just before christmas the house democrats stood firm. they stood united. historically, that's not the play of the democratic party but that does seem to be where the democrats are right now. the president is back today so there can be an opportunity for some discussions to resume. but boehner has made it clear tha
. >> this is much more important than any election. >> if the president didn't know exactly what happened, he sure as hell should have. >> candidates -- >> i was the perfect candidate for america. >> what if mitt romney isn't the best person. >> the idea that somehow making a business profitable is different than helping people is really a foreign idea. >> and more. >> it's ridiculously easy for someone to purchase a gun. >> do you think homosexuality is a sin? >> i think that it's -- it's -- it's unnatural. >> did you get up this morning and have a quick -- >> i probably did, i probably did. >> "piers morgan tonight: the newsmakers" starts now. >>> good evening. one of the great things about my job is that every night i get to sit down with movers and shakers, the men and women at the center of the biggest stories of the year. what do they have in common? they're all utterly fascinating. tonight you'll hear from some of my favorite guests. we'll begin with the big man himself, governor chris christie. he found himself in a bit of hot water for making nice with president obama in the wake of hurr
for reelection. first elected in 1993 she served three turned in the u.s. senate and will be succeeded by newly elected senator ted cruise. on wednesday senator hutchison gave her farewell speech. it is half an hour. >> i rise today to address this chamber for possibly the last time a senior senator from the great state of texas. i have to say it is an ironic note that if i had given my farewell address last week, there would have been so much joy in the halls of the capital ringing with laughter and anticipation of our season's happiest time. but in just one weekend a sadness has set in with the news of a massacre of innocent children in newtown, conn. followed by the loss of our wonderful colleague, senator daniel inouye. i will leave this extraordinary institution and experience with heavy heart for those that have been lost in the last few days. i do want to thank the people of texas for asking me to represent them in washington. i want to thank the many people who served on my staff for almost 20 years. i have to say i am touched that both benches on both sides of this room are filled with
conservative of senators elected. whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues got resolved on civil rights. senator byrd gets on the leadership ladder and he rises. he becomes the whip in a stealth campaign. the idea of robert byrd as leader goes from being inconceivable to virtually inevitable. he has earned his way up to be leader. at the beginning of my book, he becomes leader and replaces mike mansfield, who is sort of an icon. no one thinks byrd can replace mike mansfield. but the truth is, no one thought that mike mansfield could replace lyndon johnson. that is certain the way things work. as my book starts, the first chapter is about byrd. it is entitled "the grind." he is hard-wo
political transitions that have taken place in terms of going from a non elected it representation and the articulation of goals to an elective -- a transitional government and in an elected government up on the national and the local level. you don't see that elsewhere, at least not as in a striking as fashion. and the rest of the book i talk quite a bit about the personality of qaddafi and what motivated him. many people argued that the personalities of the dictators themselves really don't matter. in the case of libya i think does not quite true. qaddafi was a near kerrville intelligence person in math certain fixations. i tried to be diplomatic here. but they're is a lot of strangeness was motivated his behavior in ways which i think were so bizarre that many of the people who looking at this from the u.s. policy side, not in a way where customers to thinking about things. that posed problems. after 1986 bombing in benghazi and tripoli qaddafi was rumored to have gone into a tremendous fun for several months. if you fast-forward, this is something that looks like it happened af
-term unemployed are not their problem. in fact, this country was founded on the principle that we elect a congress to make it their problem, to make it their concern and to go out and do something about it. >> john nichols, you and your family have a great christmas. great to have you with us here tonight. >> and to you as well. >> i'm going to be taking a few days off next week. you bet, my friend. michael eric dyson will be doing the show. we'll be having a wonderful christmas at the schultz household. my wife wendy has finished her chemotherapy. she is on the road to recovery, or should i say she is cured. we are so thankful. it's been a rough six months. but we are together, and that is the main thing. this is "the ed show" for for this year. i'm ed schultz. "the rachel maddow show" starts right now. >> a merry, merry, merry, merry christmas to you. you guys have had a hell of a year. >> thanks, rachel. you have a merry christmas. >> thank you. and thanks to you at home for joining us tonight. ahead of this holiday weekend, on a day when the world of news didn't slow down for the holiday weeke
leaders met with the president since november 16 in a post-election session. and new this morning, cnbc's john heart swood reporting a mini deal could be in the works. without it like a 60 to 90-day deal and include some tax raises basically for those making about $400 $400,000 or more. this morning a few senators in both parties struck a hopeful tone about the meetings. >> getting a little more optimistic today. >> i think that it is encouraging that people are talking. >> talk is good but on substance, little has changed. >> problem has not been democrats being willing to do cuts. the problem is receive gnaws. we believe this isn't a revenue issue. this is a spending issue. >> house republicans also called their members back to washington for work this sunday. that was after democrats blasted speaker boehner for their absence just yesterday. >> mr. speaker, we ought to be here. working. addressing these challenges. >> we are here in washington working. while the members of the house of representatives are out watching movies and watching their kids play soccer and basketball and doing
to be re-elected. >> that's right. they're going to need a lot of power going forward to get lngs through. >> we heard this on friday, we heard it on sunday from lapierre. he was using the terms "good guys" fairly frequently. does that positive association he's making with police officers, of those who are trained using gun, using the terms "good guys" is that what we expect to hear for all those who are opponents of gun legislation going forward? >> i think so. i think that will be part of the conversation. but, you know, this will be a really difficult battle on capitol hill, especially in the house but also in the senate. we see a lot of democrats up nor reelection in two years from more rural states so it might be difficult for them as well to fully embrace some of the issues being talked about or some of the policies going forward. so much we might see this in little bits of legislation. >> i was reading a number over 50% of those of the 113th who were put into office receive money from the nra. that would make things very difficult i would imagine as they are of course thinking abou
elected as republicans on the republican ticket, or the notion that people have been dreaming about since 2009 that the tea party will dry up and blow away. these tea party activists are people with long standing commitment to ideals and note their activism matters. they will be there and the next election cycle. >> that was former house majority leader dick armey. freedomworks has been pivotal force behind the victories of tea party candidates are recent years. the money for dick armey's exit came from illinois billionaire richard stephenson, founder of the for-profit cancer trim centers of america. he was reportedly behind more than $20 in donations funneled to the freedomworks super pac in the weeks before the 2012 election. for more we're joined by kenneth vogel "democracy now!" videostream. he recently wrote an article, "inside the dick armey, freedomworks split." welcome to "democracy now!" dick armey came down with an armed guard to try to take over his organization? >> is a bizarre story. a lot led up to to get to that point. my understanding is, by reporting suggests there may ha
'm the newly-elected president of the united states who has a legacy to think about why wooir take that chance? certainly my friends on capitol hill on the republican side of the aisle have come to the reerlization that the president is prepared to take them over the fiscal cliff which is why you have the boehner move. i don't understand why you'd want to start the presidency with the potential of going over a fiscal cliff that could potentially put us into a recession. why not work a deal for the short term. why not look to do something more broad based next year? >> it would be been good to do it two months ago but the reality is, there's always risk. realistically if we take 5 to be 10, 20 days. the markets panic over everything. i assume these are rational actors. even if the market goes down 3 or 4%, markets fluctuate all the time. it goes down one day and back the next week and the impact on the economy is the same thing as my decision to go out to dinner next week. >> i disagree with that statement. it goes down 3 or 4% and then a lot of wealth has been destroyed. >> but it comes back.
because they believed in this thing so strongly. and he said, i'd rather have lost the entire election and won the soldiers' vote than won the election and lost the soldiers. >> what about the scene where you, where the amendment is in doubt, lincoln himself seems skeptical that they're going to make it, and seward has been pushing him to be careful, not to let it be known that he's around town trying to rouse up votes. and they're in the theater and mary lincoln turns -- well, let's look at it. >> you think i'm ignorant of what you're up to because you haven't discussed this scheme with me as you ought to have done. when have i ever been so easily bamboozled? i believe you when you insist that amending the constitution and abolishing slavery will end this war and since you are sending our son into the war, woe into you if you fail to pass the amendment. >> seward doesn't want me leaving big muddy footprints all over town. >> no one has ever lived who knows better than you the proper placement of footfalls on treacherous paths. seward can't do it. you must. because if you fail to acqui
was first elected to the u.s. house in 2010. this is about 35 minutes. >> good morning and it is a great day in south carolina. it's a historic day in south carolina, because, you know, first of all, we all were saddened and surprised when senator demint told us that he was not going to continue in the u.s. senate. but i will tell you, as i've told many people, that the heritage foundation is blessed. he will lift them up to an amazing new level. it's a foundation that i have always had great respect for, and they could not have made a more perfect pick. in this decision and process that we went through, there is no replacing jim demint, there is no replacing him. there is no one that can fill his shoes. there is no one that can really carry on that torch. and i don't -- i think that says a lot about him. i think it says a lot about how he has changed the face of south carolina in the way that we have a lot to be proud of. but i also think this is a new day. and it is with great pleasure that i am announcing that i am appointing our next u.s. senator to be congressman, tim scott. [applause]
had no hope. however illusory, that the next election or the other party might turn things around. in fact, there were no elections this absence. authority resided with the teen and parliament. columnist complained that their political leaders were out of touch and it was not a rhetorical florist. no taxation without representation would ultimately become the rallying cry for a war against the most formidable military power on earth. given our current sorry economic circumstances, and bellicose political rhetoric might have its appeal. we could also a member that the exhortations of our forefathers were made on behalf of the desired to forge a nation or group of colonies that even then comprised quite disparate interest. winters and farmers and merchants. slaves, indentured servants and persecuted minorities of all kinds. even after the nation was forged, tough times and were well into the succeeding century. but the citizenry was united in the common purpose to enter into succeeding. to those who forged a system of government, nothing was more important than the maintenance of th
for election. everybody else is pretty much locked in whether we go over the cliff or not. is it thelma and louuisuise or laverne and shirley? they all place their bets a year-and-a-half ago. the election decided it. host: thank you for the call. bill has this point. we are down to the wire in terms of negotiations. jackie is joining us from georgia. caller: good morning. i cannot believe i got through. i have been trying for so long. host: thank you for being persistent. caller: the guy from the newspaper is wrong. we are not stupid. we know what is going on. i am 71 years old. i'm so worried about going down and being a third-world country. john boehner has to get his act together. he is not worried about anything. and the tea party -- give me a break. they are not worried about anything but taking us down. i still cannot believe i got to talk to you guys. thank you for listening. if obama could run again, i would vote for him again. he wants to do something. the republicans do not. if a republican was in the white house, there would not be any worry about paying for sandy, unemployme
ten moments of an election year is like finding your favorite grain of sand on the beach. there are an impossible number of possibilities. there are the moments when catch phrases become boomerangs. >> if you got a business, you didn't build that. >> i like being able to fire people who provide services to me. >> when cast members stole the spotlight. >> i'm an american woman who us contraception. let's start there. >> almost like an etch a sketch, you can shake it up and we start all over again. >> a fair number of moments ranging from ridiculous to explicable. >> i'm not going to shut up. it's my turn. >> i think it's called romnesia. >> if i were to coin a term it would be obamaloney. >> so many moments so much nonsense. but there were moments that shook up the race or made history and made our top ten list. >> it was seen at the time as a proxy race for november. wisconsin's republican governor scott walker in a showdown with organized labor over budget cuts and collective bargaining power. turns out the end result was no bellwether for the presidential race. walker w
to italians to embrace the spirit of cooperation in upcoming elections. >> tens of thousands of people showed up in st. peter's square to hear benedict's message, and millions to and in worldwide. >> tens of thousands of people turned out to hear the pope's christmas message. the square erupted in applause as the pontiff stepped out to address the crowd. he revisited one of the themes of his christmas eve message -- the wish for peace in the middle east. turning and i to syria, he called for an end to the conflict -- turning an eye to syria. the pope appealed to those responsible to stop the bloodshed and slaughter of innocent people. he called for dialogue in order to find a political solution to the conflict. the pope then delivered a christmas message in 65 languages. >> remind the world that true happiness lies in their hearts with hope and joy, for the savior has been born for us. >> for many in the audience, hearing the message in their own language was an obvious highlight. then came the blessing -- to the city and to the world. >> we are joined now in our studio by our religious affai
expect going up to the elections? >> parliamentary elections will still show this division but i do not think the islamists will get the majority this time. the opposition is trying to unify itself and offer economic progress and that is what the muslim brotherhood is doing. they are leading moral discussions and the people know they cannot beat freedom or sharia law. >> he has been a hugely controversial figure. how you think he will emerge? stronger or weaker? >> he seems to be strong after the constitutional referendum, but i'm afraid you will get weaker. not able to bring egyptians together and if he will not lead to more division in the country. egypt is on the verge of economic collapse. they need a strong leadership which is having confidence in political issues and that is what the muslim brotherhood is not having right now. >> do you think mohamed morsi is capable to leave them out of the economic crisis? >> he is not the right man at the moment because he does not seem to be president of the egyptians. >> and egyptian author and political scientists living in germany. than
this by electrical means. they had to win an election and they were not at all confident about that coming into was an incredible amount of violence and intimidation that went into it and the results are very uneven. they call a convention and voted up secession by lunchtime on the first day completely unanimously that's how they went out of the union. but what had preceded that? when you are in a meeting and everything is unanimous don't you get a little suspicious? why do. and there was a lot of back story to how they pulled that off. other places the back story really showed. in alabama the country representatives just charged they were being run out of the union of democracy was being completely violated. people in virginia look a was happening in the deep south and said no -- no ordinary farmer has voted for this. that the elites have run our side of the union without the proper consideration of space process, and it really was. it's very -- i think it's interesting that it's very real feeling of what democracy was and meant and the regime and 1860's. they called it a democracy althou
's new constitution. five years ago, violence erupted after disputed general elections with the clashes centered in the west valley and the capital. more than 1000 people were killed. officials are working hard to avoid a repeat during next march's presidential election, but these episodes of violence around the country are raising fears that parts of kenya macy violence during the voting period. >> now to the ongoing negotiations to prevent the so- called fiscal cliff we have mentioned. there are just 10 days to go until this potentially damaging combination of tax increases and spending cuts goes into effect, but so far, the politicians seem no closer to averting the plunge. president obama is pressing for action. he had this to say just a few minutes ago. >> i just spoke to speaker boehner and i also met with senator reid. i have asked the leaders of congress to prevent tax hikes on middle-class americans, protect unemployment insurance for 2 million americans, and lay the groundwork for further work. that is an achievable goal. that can get down in 10 days. >> president obama there
. if there are disagreements, they sort through the disagreements. the notion that our elected leadership can't do the same thing is mind boggling to them. >> the president seemed to be much more comfortable in the white house briefing room today using the bully pulpit saying enough is enough. >> he did. i thought that he sounded like a man who knows he holds, if not all of the cards, but a lot of them. he has the advantage here, and the polls indicate as with bill clinton in the showdown with newt gingrich and the shutdown of the '90s the public blames the republicans when this happens when over on the house side, you have so many republicans who are so far right and worried about somebody farther right running against them in primaries that john boehner is having a hard time to get them to agree to his packages like plan b out here. we don't know how much out here in the public things have changed since last week, but it seemed like president obama was saying something that he was planning to say if it came down to the last few days. >> joy, is this the same kind of negotiation we saw in the first term?
't understand how these people cannot do their jobs that they're elected to. so i'm wondering what's your take on what's going on in washington? you're sitting in washington. >> right. the at least we have bipartisan agreement it's all nuts, right? everyone agrees this is ridiculous and in spite of what they say, they've been talking about it for months and years and there was ample talk about what a framework should be through the election, which wasn't that long ago. there's plenty of debate. to tie the two stories we have been talking wiabout together, there was a colin powerful doctrine that general schwartzkopf executed so well in the first gulf war. which was have an exit strategy and using overwhelming force. this congress had an exit strategy. they had the idea of overwhelming force, and they set themselves these limits. if they got through this deadline the pain would be so great on themself -- this is self-imposed -- they would find a way out. they have not executed their own strategy and been able to vote for their own leadership. what you have in washington just to take a step back
. >> this government would lead the country in a transitional phase, which would end with new elections. they could be presidential elections if the parties concerned agree to it, or parliamentary elections.% >> but what role syria's president assad might play -- on that brahimi said nothing. syria's opposition has already dismissed his suggestions. hope for a rapid end to the bloodshed seems optimistic. >> syria will be the special focus later this half hour. >> we will have a special report from the turkish-syrian border. in other news, u.s. president barack obama has broken off his christmas vacation to resume talks on the so-called fiscal cliff, taxes and spending cuts unless democrats and republicans reach a deal by new year's eve. >> nearly all the major players in those negotiations are starting to agree on one thing, and that is that a deal is virtually impossible by that deadline. senior officials say there is little hope of a grand bargain to shave trillions of dollars off of america's mountain of debt. >> applause for the bell at the start of the trading day is a daily ritual at the new
as pirptions when you could have done more much this elective life and i know malia brought up the love for your family but some. our legislative staff have been waiting with shots to get the festivity started and so thank you sean for your years of service. >>> thank you very much mr. president i'll try to keep it brief and needless to say, i don't believe that sean elsburnd was the first people to endorse he for supervisor but, one of the things that, became very clear to my when i first got elected and started talking to colleagues on the board of supervisors was how seriously sean else person takes this job and i don't know that i fully appreciated how challenging this job can be. it's a job that really dmadle the very best of all of us to do this right besides the legislative work, the work that happens in terms of you know serving addressing the nuts and bolts of what happens in a neighborhood, what was so incredible about coming on the board and talking to sean was just learning from him how he approached it up you know that the fact that he saw this as an opportunity to serve
of the ordinance by elected officials or department heads, but also those that come directly to us and don't go through the task force. is that right? >> i think this language was included just to make sure it was clear that any referral from the task force or in the off chance by the supervisor of record. this is not something that would come directly to the commission. >> but a referral, where the order of determination is a willful violation of a department head or an elected official would still go under chapter 3; right? >> correct. >> and this is just referring to allegations of non-willful. >> okay. >> so katherine is right in one aspect that the potential exists and the other part of this there was a concern that if something that staff was not a party of interest, if you will and a referral. so the only time that staff would be a party of interest is if we initiated the complaint and therefore, the executive director wouldn't have a role apart from providing you a legal recommendation on what was presented to him. that shows the intent of this. so that if a referral came allege
and to the john burden done and she was elected to the board of supervisors in 2,002 and pan banned toxic chemicals and toys and led effort to protect local woman and minority business in his contracting practices focused on woman's health and domestic violence suspicious now keep in mind this is a ten year career that i'm condensing into five bullet points? he was a pointed majority and speaker pro testimony making mer her the most senior asian woman in the state of california she pass of the legislation, again like i mentioned she led the evident and continues to lead the effort to pass the high speed rail bonds and looked out for the san franciscoians interest in passing legislation to improve reliability and healthcare child care programs and protect consumers and regulating lock submit and tatoo parlors but with a ms. miles will be leaving after ten years of service she has been a personal friend and mentor to me and she has spend a lot of time mentoring a lot of people in this particular champ better and she is a woman that, that i respect and it's a privilege to be able to prese
election that i think has huge potential to be participants and be excited about this program and young communities of color and different kinds of communities that before hadn't been as engaged, and it seems like a way to engage and educate those communities that really around social media, and i saw in here there is a big focus working with cbo's and operating their networks, but i would love to see something in here that social media is going to be maximized, what that looks like, whatever the plan is and i know for me and i'm not the emerging demographic and i'm not home much but to reach that constituency we have to maximize the tools which they respond to. i would love to see that as part of the plan. >> all right. we will highlight that more. we have a website. you're certainly aware of the public utilities commission twitter and facebook and other social media activities and cleanpower sf will certainly be engaging in all of those activities. i think maybe it could be highlighted better in the budget section certainly where we're talking about how we're funding some of this m
avalos and i'm for the going anywhere i loss an election, i didn't die. so i'm still going to be out there and this weekend, i went to a bet thing and so who knows what my next ventures will be and i still have my oslo and scandinavian -- a farmling community in the central valuegee and so i think i is it have -- so if you are thinking what am i doing going to loss oh, in the middle of winter., you know i saw a film and never scoped my interest in scandinavian culture and is that doesn't take away at all to my comment and being proud of being latin and sevenning the latin community this past year and so i'm grateful to my supporter and is grateful to the residents of district five and i love the city and happy to have had the opportunity to serve on this board. a. (applause). . >> thank you supervisor olague. our final accommodation of the day will be to our second colleague local be leaving us today although he know he is not going far sean i have to say when i read the resolution that was draft of the to you today i was honestly blown away by how much you have done over the w
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